Areas of Interest for Cancer Nanotechnology

Nanoinformatics to accelerate translation of data to knowledge

Nanoinformatics involves the development of effective mechanisms for collecting, sharing, visualizing, modeling and analyzing information relevant to the nanoscale science community. It also involves the utilization of information and communication technologies that help to launch and support efficient communities of practice. Nanoinformatics is necessary for comparative characterization of nanomaterials, for design and ...more »

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Areas of Interest for Cancer Nanotechnology

Improving Tumor Targeting

Many of the current targeting approaches (antibody/Fab, etc.,) are dependent on the EPR (enhanced permeability and retention) effect and not designed to increase extravasation of nanomedicines from the systemic circulation to extracellular space around tumors. The use of current strategies, e.g., Her2, folate, etc., increase intracellular uptake, but have not had widespread success at increasing total tumor deposition ...more »

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Areas of Interest for Cancer Nanotechnology

Fundamental mechanisms of nanoparticle drug delivery

We are developing nanoparticle drugs based on a very limited understanding of how nanoparticles are transported from vascular circulation into solid tumors. We do not know what cell types, microenvironments, or biological molecules mediate this effect in humans, what cell types take up delivered agents, and how our animal models correlate with human tumors in these respects. Mechanistic studies and comparative pathology ...more »

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Areas of Interest for Cancer Nanotechnology

Robust, Reproducible Methods for Making Targeted Nanoparticles

From an industry perspective, a potential bottleneck that will need to be overcome in bringing targeted nanoparticles from the bench to the bedside is scale-up. Existing academic laboratory environments are adequate for manufacturing enough targeted nanoparticles for ongoing preclinical studies (in vitro and in vivo). However, human studies and clinical use will require far greater quantity of targeted nanoparticles and ...more »

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Areas of Interest for Cancer Nanotechnology

Retrospective study on Nanotechnology in medicine

Iron Oxide nanoparticles are effective contrast agents for MRI, over the years we have been saying this; every publication supports their effectiveness, but currently there is no commercially available nanoparticles solution for use as contrast agent. The lone survivor is Gastromark which is used orally and has diameter of 400 nanometers (not nano, the optimum size is 1-100 nm), the most promising "Ferridex I.V" was withdrawn ...more »

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Areas of Interest for Cancer Nanotechnology

Multifunctinal or multitargeted nanoparticles

Nanoparticles conjugated with two active ligands, one for its effective uptake and the other for it's binding or use to gene delivery agents to deliver drug inside cells. We may use TAT peptide or gene delivery systems (for endoosmolysis) for effective translocation of cargo inside cells and antibody for binding. This system is complex but with optimization of the concentration of ligands on the surface on nanoparticles ...more »

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Areas of Interest for Cancer Nanotechnology

A new nanotechnology based platform for cancer therapy

Theoretically, cancer can be cured if a potent drug acts only in the tumor with sufficient concentration and duration. Nanotechnology has the potential to satisfy these requirements if some of its intrinsic shortcomings can be solved: rapid uptake of nanocarriers by RES and the toxicity as a result, and drug release outside the tumor, especially the early burst release when the fast drug release is coupled with high blood ...more »

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Areas of Interest for Cancer Nanotechnology

Clearance from liver

We have developed and studied ~100 different nanoconjugates (polymeric/metallic) for cancer imaging and therapy applications. Uptake by RES and retention in liver is a major drawback. We need to develop new technologies to clear these conjugates out from liver after sufficient time.

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